New research in the field: www.architectureofinteraction.net



  > Architecture of Interaction developed a tool kit for artists who deploy interactive work methods. Our aim is to enable communication between individuals and to forge a shift from specialised discipline-based notions of interactive work to a more open and commonly understood language. Our tool kit should allow artists from diverse backgrounds as well as art commissioners and theorists to communicate more effectively.
The toolkit is tested in London (Chisenhale Gallery) en Amsterdam (Veemvloer) in November 2005 and presented at the Stedelijk museum in december 2005. The initiative comes from Yvonne Dröge. Klaas Kuitenbrouwer, Yvonne Dröge Wendel en Lino Hellings form the core group, assisted by Nicolaus Gangsterer (Austria), Mine Kaylan (UK), Anna Best (UK) and project coördinator Wietske Maas.

 
< The critical context supplies different starting points in the process of design. You can either start off with 3 the intended interaction with the public, or with 2. the space the work is meant for or with 1 the physical artwork. If the maker does not start with 1, the choice of the medium follows the requirements of space or the intended interactions.    
  > -The inner circle is the place where the participants resides, represented. The circle surrounding that one is where the onlookers are dwelling, and the outside circle is where the witnesses-of-traces are. The relative size of the surfaces of the three circles and of the different kinds of Others in those circles indicates their importance for the work. For the work represented here the onlookers are the main kind of Others.
The others are everybody that is not the inititating author of the work.
 

There are three main categories of others:
* Participants: those who play an active part in the work, who have some kind of creative role in the development of the work. This role can take place in any part of the work process.
* Onlookers: those others who witnessed the first publication of the work(process) but that did not get their hands dirty. They form the first layer of the audience when the piece is being realised.
* Witnesses of Traces: those others who were not present when the work(process) was first made public, and that therefore only know it through its traces. They are a post-actual audience.

> 2001/2003 Research on undisciplined art in the Nederlands.
undisciplined art = art that cannot be counted to one of the different disciplines, that does not necessarily takes place in spaces meant for art. New theory, ten examples and reactions from the experts. Download the Dutch version of Ongedisciplineerde Kunst Nederland Sensitivities formed by disciplines can lead to a collision between the different cultures attached to the disciplines. Where there is a collision of cultures, that’s also where you can cross borders and find new possibilities.


> To sort this out Lino Hellings researched ‘undisciplined’ art in the Netherlands.

‘Undisciplined’ art uses an critical context:
1 The physical aspects of the work itself
2 The space, place and context where and in which the artwork is located
3 The participants (the public)
are all part of the design.

The critical context supplies different starting points in the process of design. You can either start off with 3 the intended interaction with the public, or with 2. the space the work is meant for or with 1 the physical artwork. If the maker does not start with 1, the choice of the medium follows the requirements of space or the intended interactions.

>< So it is possible that the artist uses different media and in that way enters different disciplines in every different work. Disciplines in this sense can be regarded as arenas. The maker enters a discipline by adopting its ruleset. Every discipline has partly its own, often implicit sets of rules. For the purpose of inspiring makers of different disciplines to look across borders I put into a discipline scheme the unwritten rules of comparing and contrasting principles between old and new disciplines. This is a way to reveal hidden procedures in order to draw attention to a makers own parameters and (implicit) sets of rules.